You can call me Mono - it's a pleasure to meet you. Here you'll find updates from a Master of Science (Zoology) student at Melbourne University, Australia. This is a mismatch of a place; expect updates from within Uni and from out of it. I post about both zoology and its domestic cousin, animal science, and mix photos and pictures with lengthy discussions.

  1.  

    well-thats-fantasmic-08:

    well-thats-fantasmic-08:

    well-thats-fantasmic-08:

    Guys i’m doing a research paper whether or not livestock animals should be treated humanely if we’re just going to butcher them and eat them anyway. I say yes, but I need an article on the opposing view. Can y’all help me find an…

    This might actually work! Thank you!

    Oh sweet! You’ll also be able to find heaps of evidence showing the benefits of cage hens over free-range hens (for example, cage hens display little to no feather-pecking and cannibalism versus free range), but cages are considered less humane in many other respects, so that’s another couple of things you can look into.

    Hooray! :D

    Source: well-thats-fantasmic-08

  2.  

    well-thats-fantasmic-08:

    well-thats-fantasmic-08:

    Guys i’m doing a research paper whether or not livestock animals should be treated humanely if we’re just going to butcher them and eat them anyway. I say yes, but I need an article on the opposing view. Can y’all help me find an article, preferably from a credible…

    Well it needed to be related to food so I don’t think that would work but thank you for the help, nonetheless!

    Ah, blast.

    I think you’ll be hard pressed to find something advocating rough treatment in terms of an animal’s emotional state, but there are some studies that suggest that meat quality isn’t reduced under “less favourable” housing conditions, which you may be able to use?

    This study finds that conventional housing for pigs doesn’t affect meat quality, suggesting that there’s no benefit on that side of things for upgrading to more humane housing.

    Haha, sorry, I’m not really helping at all! Best of luck!

    Source: well-thats-fantasmic-08

  3.  

    well-thats-fantasmic-08:

    Guys i’m doing a research paper whether or not livestock animals should be treated humanely if we’re just going to butcher them and eat them anyway. I say yes, but I need an article on the opposing view. Can y’all help me find an article, preferably from a credible source, that says that livestock animals shouldn’t be treated humanely, please????

    Have you considered using papers advocating tail docking or mulesing in sheep? Or advocating the lack of anesthetics in cattle surgical procedures?

    There’s a lot of argument about whether these practices are humane or not, you could potentially use these as advocating “non-humane” practices.

    I won’t go into my beliefs on it, but here are some helpful links:

    Source: well-thats-fantasmic-08

  4.   clusterpod:

Short-beaked Echidna, Tachyglossus aculeatus.
Australia’s most widespread native mammal, the echidna is a monotreme, an egg-layer. It is found in an amazingly wide variety of habitats, from above the snow line to deserts, anywhere there are ants or termites for food.
This individual photographed outside Omeo, Victoria.

Hey, check this out, I learnt something today!
I assumed the Common Brushtail Possum would be the most widespread native mammal, but no! Five years living in the city and I’ve already forgotten all the wee beasties we would see near the bush.
It’s very cool that the Short-beaked Echidna takes that title, I like that.

    Full image link →

    clusterpod:

    Short-beaked Echidna, Tachyglossus aculeatus.

    Australia’s most widespread native mammal, the echidna is a monotreme, an egg-layer. It is found in an amazingly wide variety of habitats, from above the snow line to deserts, anywhere there are ants or termites for food.

    This individual photographed outside Omeo, Victoria.

    Hey, check this out, I learnt something today!

    I assumed the Common Brushtail Possum would be the most widespread native mammal, but no! Five years living in the city and I’ve already forgotten all the wee beasties we would see near the bush.

    It’s very cool that the Short-beaked Echidna takes that title, I like that.

    (via libutron)

    Source: clusterpod

  5.  

    Why you don't need to worry about giant, invincible man-eating super-rats →

    Name: The super-rat.

    Age: As old as rats.

    Appearance: Take a wild guess.

    Like a rat? Congratulations.

    And what are its super-powers? It doesn’t have super-powers as such, but – and I don’t mean to alarm you here – there are reports that a plague of invincible giant super-rats is taking over Liverpool.

    Argh! You have alarmed me! They’re larger than average, apparently, and are proving difficult to kill with standard poisons, such as warfarin and bromadiolone.

    Someone at The Guardian has been dying to write this story.

  6.  

    WOMBATS!

    Infraclass: Marsupialia —> Order: Diprotodontia —> Family: Vombatidae

    They’re cute, they’re fuzzy, they’re brutal as hell!

    What, you weren’t expecting that last part?

    Wombats in captivity are often super cuddly (you’ve probably seen pictures of people holding them like babies, or of them on their backs on someone’s lap). But go out into the bush, and you’ll find a very different set of behaviours. Those of us who go camping know not to cross a wombat.

    Wombats can average about 1 metre in length. The three subspecies range from 20 to 35 kg - and they are all surprisingly impressive runners, reaching speeds of up to 40km/hr (25 mph), and being able to maintain that for up to 90 seconds!

    Wombats are well known to tear into (and tear down) tents at night to get to the food that careless campers leave out (I and my friends have been surprised by a wombat on our sleeping bag more than once!). Humans have been seriously injured by bites, clawings, and broken bones after being bowled over - wombats are serious creatures.

    Photo Credits: (1) (2) (3)

  7.   fuckyeahconvergentevolution:



Fuck Yeah, Convergent Evolution!
Hello! This is the inaugural post of my new side-blog, Fuck Yeah, Convergent Evolution (FYCE for short)!
Together we are going to go on a crazy-ass adventure through some of the completely fucking awesome body forms, survival strategies, and just generally bad-asseries that have evolved repeatedly and independently across various kingdoms, focussing mainly on the kingdom Animalia (because I don’t know shit about plants and other kingdoms, sorry friends).
Like all good friendships, we will begin with a definition:
“Convergent evolution describes the independent evolution of similar features in species of different lineages. Convergent evolution creates analogous structures that have similar form or function, but that were not present in the last common ancestor of those groups.” [x]
Basically it’s the coolest shit ever.
It’s the equivalent of two people inventing the telephone at the same time on opposite sides of the planet, with the only thing they have in common being a spoken language and an inability to yell loud enough to talk to someone a mile away.
But why do we care?
Well, I mean, firstly, look at that little fucker above. See him? Yeah, that’s a lesser hedgehog tenrec, Echinops telfari. I bet you thought it was a hedgehog, right? I mean, look at it. It’s a spiky little motherfucker.
Yeah no it’s more closely related to a fucking manatee than a hedgehog.
Oh, my bad, that should have come with a warning about MINDFUCK.
Yeah well, that’s why you should care. Because this shit will blow your damn mind.
Also because, you know, understanding evolution is critical to understanding life, and understanding life is critical to keep it going, and that’s basically in your best interest.
So not only is convergent evolution badass, but it’s also really important. It tells us a lot about life on this awesome fucking piece of rock we call home.
Also you should care because next time you’re on a date with someone and you run out of stuff to talk about you can be like ‘let me tell you about the tenrec’, and watch as they become progressively more impressed and associate your vast knowledge directly with your sexual prowess.
I’m just sayin’; this shit is the bomb.
So come along on the FYCE adventure! It’s gonna be a WILD ride.
You can already submit shit to the blog where you can talk about a bit of convergence that you find really fucking awesome, or you can ask me to talk about it for you.
Or you can ask about some events of convergence, because that shit stimulates curiosity.
Thanks for following! Brace yourselves for awesome times to come!

    Full image link →

    fuckyeahconvergentevolution:

    Fuck Yeah, Convergent Evolution!

    Hello! This is the inaugural post of my new side-blog, Fuck Yeah, Convergent Evolution (FYCE for short)!

    Together we are going to go on a crazy-ass adventure through some of the completely fucking awesome body forms, survival strategies, and just generally bad-asseries that have evolved repeatedly and independently across various kingdoms, focussing mainly on the kingdom Animalia (because I don’t know shit about plants and other kingdoms, sorry friends).

    Like all good friendships, we will begin with a definition:

    Convergent evolution describes the independent evolution of similar features in species of different lineages. Convergent evolution creates analogous structures that have similar form or function, but that were not present in the last common ancestor of those groups.” [x]

    Basically it’s the coolest shit ever.

    It’s the equivalent of two people inventing the telephone at the same time on opposite sides of the planet, with the only thing they have in common being a spoken language and an inability to yell loud enough to talk to someone a mile away.

    But why do we care?

    Well, I mean, firstly, look at that little fucker above. See him? Yeah, that’s a lesser hedgehog tenrec, Echinops telfari. I bet you thought it was a hedgehog, right? I mean, look at it. It’s a spiky little motherfucker.

    Yeah no it’s more closely related to a fucking manatee than a hedgehog.

    Oh, my bad, that should have come with a warning about MINDFUCK.

    Yeah well, that’s why you should care. Because this shit will blow your damn mind.

    Also because, you know, understanding evolution is critical to understanding life, and understanding life is critical to keep it going, and that’s basically in your best interest.

    So not only is convergent evolution badass, but it’s also really important. It tells us a lot about life on this awesome fucking piece of rock we call home.

    Also you should care because next time you’re on a date with someone and you run out of stuff to talk about you can be like ‘let me tell you about the tenrec’, and watch as they become progressively more impressed and associate your vast knowledge directly with your sexual prowess.

    I’m just sayin’; this shit is the bomb.

    So come along on the FYCE adventure! It’s gonna be a WILD ride.

    You can already submit shit to the blog where you can talk about a bit of convergence that you find really fucking awesome, or you can ask me to talk about it for you.

    Or you can ask about some events of convergence, because that shit stimulates curiosity.

    Thanks for following! Brace yourselves for awesome times to come!

    (via markscherz)

    Source: fuckyeahconvergentevolution

  8.  

    Last year I had an assignment in which I had to write up a fake Grant Request. It was a really intense effort, I worked on it for weeks and weeks, went through 6 drafts before the final submission and had repeated meetings and back-and-forths with my supervisors to improve it.

    The mark I got was hugely disappointing, especially when I compared it to all the other marks I was getting (and had been getting in years previous).

    Now, after my research project had to be changed cancelled, and I had to start a new one, I’m going back over that old assignment to see which concepts I can still use for my Thesis.

    But… The more I read it, the more I realise why I received such a disappointing mark. There are sentences that don’t make sense, sentences missing information, or entire paragraphs and concepts that should exist between two others that simply are not there. It’s very bizarre to me.

    So I’m angry at myself for it, because in SIX DRAFTS and numerous read throughs and in asking half a dozen other people to read it as well, not once did any of these problems get pointed out. I finished a week ahead of the due date, I had heaps of time to fix it.

    I guess the key now is to not make the same mistakes for my Thesis, but it’s not an encouraging start.

  9.   KOALAS!

Infraclass: Marsupialia —> Order: Diprotodontia —> Family: Phascolarctidae

Okay, I’ll admit, koalas are not my favourite animals, not by a long shot. But everyone else seems to love them, and they are still pretty cool things. So here’s some cool information to go along with that.
First off, let’s get one thing straight - koalas are not ‘koala bears’. Don’t get me wrong, they sometimes seem like they are (they can be so vicious at times that I cringe whenever I see a tourist hold one at a zoo!), and they look a bit like a teddy, but remember, they’re marsupials!
So, a lot of people know that koalas eat Eucalyptus leaves, but what’s cool is that even though over 600 species of Eucalyptus are available, koalas have a preference for only about 30, and tend to choose species with high protein and low fibre. Eucalypt leaves are high in water content, so koalas don’t drink often, but they’re also very low in energy, so koalas typically sleep about 20 hours a day to conserve as much energy as possible.
Northern populations are typically smaller and have lighter coloured fur than southern populations. There is some debate over whether these different populations are actually separate subspecies:
Phascolarctos cinereus adustus in the north (Queensland)
Phascolarctos cinereus cinereus in the more central east-coast (New South Wales)
Phascolarctos cinereus victor in the south (Victoria, South Australia)

    Full image link →

    KOALAS!

    Infraclass: Marsupialia —> Order: Diprotodontia —> Family: Phascolarctidae

    Okay, I’ll admit, koalas are not my favourite animals, not by a long shot. But everyone else seems to love them, and they are still pretty cool things. So here’s some cool information to go along with that.

    First off, let’s get one thing straight - koalas are not ‘koala bears’. Don’t get me wrong, they sometimes seem like they are (they can be so vicious at times that I cringe whenever I see a tourist hold one at a zoo!), and they look a bit like a teddy, but remember, they’re marsupials!

    So, a lot of people know that koalas eat Eucalyptus leaves, but what’s cool is that even though over 600 species of Eucalyptus are available, koalas have a preference for only about 30, and tend to choose species with high protein and low fibre. Eucalypt leaves are high in water content, so koalas don’t drink often, but they’re also very low in energy, so koalas typically sleep about 20 hours a day to conserve as much energy as possible.

    Northern populations are typically smaller and have lighter coloured fur than southern populations. There is some debate over whether these different populations are actually separate subspecies:

    • Phascolarctos cinereus adustus in the north (Queensland)
    • Phascolarctos cinereus cinereus in the more central east-coast (New South Wales)
    • Phascolarctos cinereus victor in the south (Victoria, South Australia)

    Source: 500px.com

  10.  

    bkcarib:

    I’ve been wondering about animal conservation.  Conserving animals from human interference I understand 100%.  But what about animals that haven’t been hunted to extinction? What about animals that just have slowly died/are slowly dying out?  Are we obligated to save the species that stop being able to reach the bar that nature sets for competition? Isn’t conserving animals from their own food chain messing with nature negatively?  Animal enthusiast, nature, eco friendly, zoology tumblr please feel free to chime in.

    I guess the thing here is that a lot of species are at high risk due to INDIRECT human interference.

    We can have negative effects on animals in a lot of ways. For example, if we remove a habitat, we cause a direct effect on the animals living there. Some die, others move away. We have an indirect effect on the areas those animals move to, and their offspring, and the other animals in those areas.

    By those animals moving, humans have altered the ecology - some of those animals will eat others at higher rates, making them endangered, and some of those animals will be eaten by others. Under natural situations, these guys might never have been in contact.

    Also consider introduced species. Many animals in Australia for example are endangered because of competition with introduced pests for food and space. So it might seem like they’re slowly dying out under natural situations, but it’s because humans interfered with the environment to cause that ecological mismatch for them.

    I’m going to be bold and go so far as to say that I think we’d be hard pressed to find an endangered species that humans haven’t impacted in some way. 

    Just my thoughts, of course.

    Source: bkcarib